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How To Make Chocolate Bath Bombs

chocbathbombs

Bath bombs are so easy to make and the variations are endless. In time for Easter we have made some delectable chocolate bath bombs with sweet almond oil. They smell amazing and contain beneficial salts for a relaxing and wonderful smelling bath time.

WHAT YOU NEED

  • Bath bomb tongs
  • 1 cup citric acid
  • 1 cup sodium bicarbonate
  • 1/2 cup corn starch
  • 1/2 cup sweet almond oil
  • 2 tsps cocoa powder
  • 8-10 drops of chocolate fragrance oil

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Add all of your dry ingredients into a mixing bowl (citric acid, sodium bicarb, corn starch, cocoa powder) and give it a good thorough mix.
    bath-bomb-instructions-1
  2. Measure out ½ cup of sweet almond oil and add this to your dry ingredients a little at a time, stirring thoroughly. Do not add to much oil to fast or you will activate your citric acid.
    bath-bomb-instructions-2
  3. Stir your ingredients together until it’s all combined. Keep stirring and mixing until your dry ingredients have mixed completely with the wet ingredients. Your mixture should resemble wet sand when mixed.
    bath-bomb-instructions-3
  4. Scoop your mixture into one side of the bath bomb tongs and pack it down tightly. Turn the tongs over and do the same to the other side. Make sure you overpack this side. Squeeze both sides of the tongs together as tightly as you can. I didn’t worry too much if they didn’t close together fully.
    bath-bomb-instructions-4
  5. After a few seconds release the tongs and your mixture should have formed a perfect ball.
    bath-bomb-instructions-5
  6. Turn the tongs over gently in your hand and very lightly just put your finger over the hole in the tong and give a little push. This is enough to loosen the ball and it will tip out in your hand. Put aside gently and let dry. I let mine dry for at  least 3 days to fully harden.
    bath-bomb-instructions-6
How To Recipes

How to make a massage candle

massage-candle-blog

There’s nothing quite like a candle massage to soothe tired and sore muscles, and the beautiful scent they throw is an added bonus.

It’s not uncommon to pay in to the hundreds for a candle massage at beauty and health spas, so we thought why not save the pocket money and enlist a willing significant other and make our own candle to do the trick!

Because of its low melt point, soy wax is most commonly used for massage candle making – and it’s super easy.

Being a natural vegetable wax it is also safer on the skin, which is great news for those with allergies or sensitivities.

Once you’ve got a handle on the basic massage candle, you can experiment with additional ingredients such as shea butter, cocoa butter, and luxurious body oils.

I’ve included this as an option below for those a little more experienced. Try adding jojoba, apricot kernel or avocado oil for beautiful moisturising effects.

*Please test all recipes on yourself before selling to ensure allergy safeness and correct consistency of the massage oil. If you plan to sell your candles, they will also need to be correctly labeled according to Australian standards.

massage-candle

What You’ll Need:

  • 30g GW 464 soy wax (this has the lowest melting point of 46-49°C)
  • 10ml sweet almond oil
  • 2ml skin-safe essential oils or fragrance oils
  • 1 double boiler
  • Suitable container for pouring (e.g. spouted tin, for the purpose of this recipe we are using a 120gm tin)
  • 1 stainless steel stirring spoon
  • Wick (it is not too important what wick you use as you are not burning the candle for long. Start with the wick you would normally use for the container you choose and see how it performs. You don’t need a huge melt pool – just enough for this particular use)
  • Wick holder or household peg

*For a more soft, luxurious candle, substitute one part of the soy wax for shea or cocoa butter. Alternative ingredients as below:

  • 20g GW 464 soy wax
  • 10g shea or cocoa butter
  • 10ml sweet almond oil
  • 2ml skin-safe essential oils or fragrance oils

Instructions:

  1. Place the wax and oil (and butter, if using) in to your double boiler. Melt down, stirring gently with the spoon. Alternatively, you can melt in the microwave – just use short bursts of 30 seconds to prevent burning and overheating. candle-making-double-boiler-small
  2. Once melted, add your fragrance and gently stir until well combined. candle-making-stirring-small
  3. While the wax is cooling, set up your container with the wick and wick holder. candle-making-candle-holder-small
  4. Once the wax has cooled (but still melted), pour in to your container and leave overnight. Once set, trim the wick so that it sits approximately 1cm above your candle. candle-making-pouring-small

Instructions for use:

  1. Light the candle and allow a small melt pool to form – just enough for your use.
  2. Extinguish the flame and allow the melt pool to cool a little so that it is not too hot on the skin.
  3. Pour the desired amount on to your hands or directly on to the skin.
  4. Massage and enjoy!
How To Recipes

How to make egg shell tealights

egg-shell-2015_05_27-01_55_36-utc

Materials

• Sewing needle
• Eggs
• Vinegar
• Food colouring
• Empty egg carton
• Double boiler or two pots
• GW 464
• Dye blocks
• Tealight wicks
• Plastic jug

Instructions

Step 1

Make a hole in the top of each egg with the needle; enlarge the holes, and pour out the contents. Cut the shells to one-third of the way down and clean the shells with the
vinegar to remove any excess egg.

Step 2

Dye shells with food colouring (follow the directions on the food colouring box). Put the shells inside the empty carton to dry.

Step 3

In a double boiler, melt your wax and and add some dye block shavings if you are using colour.

Step 4

Put an aussie stickum on the bottom of an ACS 1.0 tealight wick and place in the bottom of the shell, pressing carefully to stick but taking care not to break the shell

Step 5

Use the plastic pouring jug which has a long thin neck to fill the shells with wax. Let the wax harden. Trim the wicks to 5mm and place the candles in ceramic eggcups
before lighting.

How To Recipes

How to make aroma bead diffusers

beads

Materials Needed

Aroma Beads (around 455gms)
Candle Dye
Candle fragrance or essential oil (20-30%)
Zip lock bag
Aroma Jar

Directions

Start off with 20% fragrance (based on the weight of your beads), and place in the zip lock bag with your beads. (LESS IS BEST when starting out.) You can always add more oil but you can’t take it away. If you use too much oil it will not soak into the beads and you will have to add additional beads.

You can always add more fragrance. You can add up to 30% of oil to your beads. Just be careful not to add too much.

You can add additional oil if you feel the need, however adding more oil is not necessarily going to make the beads smell longer, it will just take longer to absorb. Some fragrance oils absorb faster than others.
If using Essential oils, BE careful. They absorb twice as fast as fragrance oils.

Vanilla based or leather based fragrances WILL take longer to dry.

If you want to use dye add 1 drop of colour into the fragrance oil, swish the colour until mixed. You may add more colour as needed. You may also add additional colour after the beads are dry. This will give the beads a variegated look. Mix the colour well within the oil.

You CANNOT use food colouring or skin safe dye. It will bead up in the oil and come off on your hands or whatever it touches.

Slowly add the fragrance to the ziplock bag. Shake the beads or massage the bag when all has been added to disperse the colour and oil throughout. The beads should be wet throughout.

Vigorously shake or massage the beads in the bag for a minute or two to be sure they are all mixed. Depending on the weight of the fragrance oil, your beads could take from a few hours to a day or two before the beads are complete. If it is not soaking up as fast as you would like, you can add additional beads.

* NOTE: Every time you walk by your beads, pick up the bag and shake them. Essential oils do work differently. DO NOT leave them to stand for very long, as they normally cure very quickly.
Citrus oils will also usually cure quicker. Orange, Lemon and any citrus fragrances can clump. Just break apart with you hands. Citrus cure quickly.

When the beads are done, they should be dry to the touch and the bag should shake clean of beads on the sides. There may be a bit of residue at the bottom, but that is okay. Throw in a few unscented beads and shake. Some heavier oils may take 2-3 days to cure.

Transfer the beads from the bag into your aroma jar.

* NOTE: Cure your beads at least 3-4 days before packaging. The less the time you let them sit, the less time they will keep their smell! Different fragrances will last for different lengths of times just like candles and some will be stronger than other Continue Reading